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Clarendon College 2016-2017 Evaluation of Mission Statement Provisions

Clarendon College (CC) evaluates success with respect to student achievement consistent with its mission. Criteria utilized include key elements derived from items in the strategic plan One College... One Vision 2014.2017. A variety of methods are used in this evaluation including a review of internal data from the CC Office of Institutional Research (OIR), results from the Community College Survey of Students Engagement (CCSSE), the Texas Legislative Budget Board Performance Measures (LBBPM) and the Texas Public Higher Education Almanac (TPHEA) and Accountability data (THECBA).


Provision for Student Access


In its effort to fulfill its mission and serve its students, CC offers both credit and non-credit courses including academic course for transfer, dual credit courses for service area high schools, technical courses for employment including certification and licensure, and continuing education for personal growth and enrichment. The College uses enrollment and demographic data from internal reports generated by the OIR in conjunction with THECB accountability measures and data reported in the TPHEA and LBBPM. The enrollment data is used to evaluate the number of students being served in each area mentioned to assess levels of student access. Comparisons of previous term enrollments are also used to identify changes in enrollment trends and aid in the planning of future course offerings to improve student access at CC. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for student access.


Table 1: Evaluation Results for Student Access Provision

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Student Access

Fall Enrollment: Controlled Growth of 2.5% each year.

Fall 2009 to Fall 2014

Average: -2.9%

Change in Fall Enrollment

Fall 2009 – Fall 2010: 11.3%

Fall 2010 – Fall 2011: -15.2%

Fall 2011 – Fall 2012: -7.3%

Fall 2012 – Fall 2013: -2.6%

Fall 2013 – Fall 2014: -1.2%

Fall 2014 – Fall 2015: 12%

Fall 2015 – Fall 2016: 10.6%

Fall 2016 – Fall 2017: 7.0%



Provision for Student Progression & Completion



CC tracks completion and success rates for all courses for in order to evaluate its effectiveness at promoting student progression and completion. Course completion is defined as completing a course and receiving a grade, even a failing grade, while successful course completion is defined as receiving a passing grade (C or better). CC also defines student completion in a more holistic way as a student’s completion of the core course requirements and graduation with either a certificate or associate’s degree. CC continually monitors these measures each semester and compares the results with those from previous semesters and the average for schools of the same size in Texas to track student progression and completion. A threshold of 91% of attempted credit hours being completed has been established, and 58% of students persisting after one year and 42% after 2 years have been established as shown in the following table. Additionally, CC has established a 14.5% threshold for 3, 4 and 6-year associate’s graduation rates, a 10% threshold for 3, 4 and 6-year certificate graduation rates, and transfer rates to 4-year schools of 38% for academic students and 18% for technical students. These threshold rates are consistent with the 5-year average for same-size colleges in Texas and have been deemed to be appropriate as they match the 5-year average rates for CC’s cohort college group. These rates also allow for a timely completion of each student’s educational intent. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for student progression and completion.


Table 2: Evaluation Results for Student Progression and Completion Provision

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Student Progression and Completion

Fall Credit Hour Completion Rate: 91% of attempted credit hours completed.

Fall 2009-Fall 2013 Average:92.4%


State Average: 91.0%

% of Fall Cr. Hrs. Completed1

Fall 2009: 93.1%

Fall 2010: 92.0%

Fall 2011: 91.3%

Fall 2012: 92.5%

Fall 2013: 93.2%

Fall 2014: 92.6%

Fall 2015: 93.4%

Fall 2016: 93.3%

Fall 2017: 94.2%


1-year persistence rate: 58% of students persisting after 1 year.

Fall 2009 to Fall 2013 Average:

58.7%


State Cohort Average: 58.2%

1-Year Persistence Rates

Fall 2009: 65.5%

Fall 2010: 53.1%

Fall 2011: 54.0%

Fall 2012: 52.7%

Fall 2013: 68.4%

Fall 2014: 62.3%

Fall 2015: 50.7%

Fall 2016: 55.7%

Fall 2017: N/A2


2-year persistence rate: 42% of students persisting after 2 years.

Fall 2008 to Fall 2012 average:

37.9%


State cohort average: 41.8%

2-Year Persistence Rates

Fall 2008: 42.5%

Fall 2009: 41.3%

Fall 2010: 35.9%

Fall 2011: 35.7%

Fall 2012: 34.7%

Fall 2013: 43.8%

Fall 2014: 41.0%

Fall 2015: 30.4%

Fall 2016: N/A2

Fall 2017: N/A3


3, 4 and 6 year Academic graduation rate: 45% of students seeking an Associate’s Degree graduating within 6 years.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 46.0%


State cohort average: 43.6%

6-Year Graduation Rates4

FY 2010: 45.6%

FY 2011: 45.4%

FY 2012: 50.5%

FY 2013: 44.8%

FY 2014: 48.4%

FY 2015: 36.6%

FY 2016: 38.8%

FY 2017: 38.6%


3, 4 and 6 year Technical graduation rate: 30% of students seeking an AAS or certificate graduating within 6 years.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 44.3% State cohort average: 30.2%

6-Year Completion Rates4

FY 2010: 46.0%

FY 2011: 49.3%

FY 2012: 49.5%

FY 2013: 40.7%

FY 2014: 59.5%

FY 2015: 50.0%

FY 2016: 28.6%

FY 2017: 55.3%


Academic student transfer rate: 38% of academic students transferring to a 4- year institution.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 36.2%


State cohort average: 38.3%

Acad. Students Transferring4

FY 2010: 48.6%

FY 2011: 37.7%

FY 2012: 35.9%

FY 2013: 27.1%

FY 2014: 31.9%

FY 2015: 25.5%

FY 2016: 22.3%

FY 2017: 22.8%


Technical student transfer rate: 18% of technical students transferring to a 4- year institution.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 26.5%


State cohort average: 18.0%

Tech. Students Transferring4

FY 2010: 37.5%

FY 2011: 41.9%

FY 2012: 19.3%

FY 2013: 21.9%

FY 2014: 11.9%

FY 2015: 4.7%

FY 2016: 7.8%

FY 2017: 3.5%

1 This measure was calculated using the THECB method which includes courses with grades other than "W" or "I" as being completed.

In Fall 2016, 85.9% of credit hours were successfully completed with a passing of "D" or better and 81.6% with a grade of "C" or better. In Fall 2017, 87.7% of credit hours were successfully completed with a passing of "D" or better and 83.4% with a grade of "C" or better

2 The 1-year & 2-year persistence rates rely on Fall 2018 enrollment data which will not be available until March 2019.

3 The 2-year persistence rate relies on Fall 2019 enrollment data which will not be available until March 2020.

4 To insure consistency in evaluating these measures the 6-year completion and transfer rates as calculate by the THECB are used. THECB releases this data around March of the following FY (FY 2018 data will not be made available by the THECB until March 2019).



Provision for Quality Educational Programs


Students and faculty work in partnership to accomplish the goal of learning. Therefore the provision of quality instruction is a priority at the institution. While individual programs and faculty track student learning via student learning outcomes and through the widespread use of student evaluations of instruction, the institution monitors the provision of quality instruction via the use of indirect indicators at a broader level using the same measures as are used for monitoring student progression and completion. The level of course completion as measured by attempted credit hours completed, the number of students completing core requirements, and graduation rates give an indication of a student’s ability to master course material and progress with their educational goals assuming a correlation with quality of instruction. An additional indicator of the quality of educational programs at CC is the percent of contact hours taught by full-time faculty with an established threshold of 72% of all contact hours being taught by full- time faculty. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for quality educational programs.

Table 3: Evaluation Results for Quality Educational Programs Provision

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision of quality educational programs

Fall Credit Hour Completion Rate: 91% of attempted credit hours completed.

Fall 2009-Fall 2013 Average:92.4%


State Average: 91.0%

% of Fall Cr. Hrs. Completed1

Fall 2009: 93.1%

Fall 2010: 92.0%

Fall 2011: 91.3%

Fall 2012: 92.5%

Fall 2013: 93.2%

Fall 2014: 92.6%

Fall 2015: 93.4%

Fall 2016: 93.3%

Fall 2017: 94.2%


1-year persistence rate: 58% of students persisting after 1 year.

Fall 2009 to Fall 2013 Average:

58.7%


State Cohort Average: 58.2%

1-Year Persistence Rates

Fall 2009: 65.5%

Fall 2010: 53.1%

Fall 2011: 54.0%

Fall 2012: 52.7%

Fall 2013: 68.4%

Fall 2014: 62.3%

Fall 2015: 50.7%

Fall 2016: 55.7%

Fall 2017: N/A2


2-year persistence rate: 42% of students persisting after 2 years.

Fall 2008 to Fall 2012 average:

37.9%


State cohort average: 41.8%

2-Year Persistence Rates

Fall 2008: 42.5%

Fall 2009: 41.3%

Fall 2010: 35.9%

Fall 2011: 35.7%

Fall 2012: 34.7%

Fall 2013: 43.8%

Fall 2014: 41.0%

Fall 2015: 30.4%

Fall 2016: N/A2

Fall 2017: N/A3


3, 4 and 6 year Academic graduation rate: 45% of students seeking an Associate’s Degree graduating within 6 years.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 46.0%


State cohort average: 43.6%

6-Year Graduation Rates4

FY 2010: 45.6%

FY 2011: 45.4%

FY 2012: 50.5%

FY 2013: 44.8%

FY 2014: 48.4%

FY 2015: 36.6%

FY 2016: 38.8%

FY 2017: 38.6%


3, 4 and 6 year Technical graduation rate: 30% of students seeking an AAS or certificate graduating within 6 years.

FY 2010 to FY 2014

average: 44.3%


State cohort average: 30.2%

6-Year Completion Rates4

FY 2010: 46.0%

FY 2011: 49.3%

FY 2012: 49.5%

FY 2013: 40.7%

FY 2014: 59.5%

FY 2015: 50.0%

FY 2016: 28.6%

FY 2017: 55.3%


Full-time faculty: 70% of all credit hours or contact hours taught by full-time faculty.

Fall 2009 to Fall 2013 average:

72.9%


State cohort average: 72.2%

% of Fall Cr. Hrs. Taught by FT Faculty

Fall 2009: 79.8%

Fall 2010: 76.8%

Fall 2011: 72.0%

Fall 2012: 70.9%

Fall 2013: 65.1%

Fall 2014: 75.5%

Fall 2015: 77.4%

Fall 2016: 71.8%

Fall 2017: 71.3%

1. This measure was calculated using the THECB method which includes courses with grades other than "W" or "I" as being completed.

In Fall 2016, 85.9% of credit hours were successfully completed with a passing of "D" or better and 81.6% with a grade of "C" or better. In Fall 2017, 87.7% of credit hours were successfully completed with a passing of "D" or better and 83.4% with a grade of "C" or better

2. The 1-year & 2-year persistence rates rely on Fall 2018 enrollment data which will not be available until March 2019.

3 The 2-year persistence rate relies on Fall 2019 enrollment data which will not be available until March 2020.

4 To insure consistency in evaluating these measures the 6-year completion and transfer rates as calculate by the THECB are used. THECB releases this data around March of the following FY (FY 2018 data will not be made available by the THECB until March 2019).

 

 

Provision for Student Services for holistic development



CC provides student support programs, services, and activities consistent with its mission that are intended to promote student learning and enhance the development of its students. The College recognizes that student support programs and services enhance the educational development and academic success of students and strives to ensure that its policies, personnel, programs, and activities are consistent with the diverse needs and interests of the population it serves. Each service offered is managed by an assigned support service department within the College, with assessment and evaluation methods consisting of the results obtained from administering the Community College Survey of Student Engagement each year which is supplemented with the results from surveys administered by the OIR and each department that provides the service. Additional assessment and evaluation is provided by an examination of student participation in school activities and organizations and the number of students using available services. A threshold level of a CCSSE benchmark score of 50 and a minimum of 70% of students responding as being at least somewhat satisfied with each of the services offered on departmental surveys and CCSSE questions relating to the service has been established. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for Student Services for holistic development.

Table 4: Evaluation Results for Student Services for Holistic Development

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Student Services for Holistic Development

CCSSE questions pertaining to encouraging the use of offered student support services (9b, 9d, 9e & 9f): 60% of students responding "quite a bit" or "very much."

An average of 59.7% of students responded “quite a bit” or “very much” on the 2014 CCSSE survey questions pertaining to CC emphasizing the student support services offered.

% of students responding “quite a bit” or “very much” on CCSSE questions on encouraging use of support services:


Spring 2016: 51.1%

Spring 2017: 30.95%


(Next administration March/April 2018)


CCSSE questions pertaining to student use of offered support services (4m, 12.1a, 12.1b, 12.1d,

12.1e, 12.1g, 12.1h,

12.1I, 12.1j & 12.1k):

60% of students responding that they use student support services “sometimes” or “often”.

An average of 60.3% of students responded “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on the 2014 CCSSE

survey questions pertaining to their use of the student support services offered.

% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on CCSSE questions on use of support services offered:


Spring 2016: 35.9%

Spring 2017: 46.8%


(Next administration March/April 2018)


CCSSE questions pertaining to student satisfaction with the support services offered (12.2a, 12.2b, 12.2c, 12.2d, 12.2e,

12.2g, 12.2h, 12.2I,

12.2j & 12.2k): 80%

of students responding as being somewhat or very satisfied with the student services offered.

An average of 83.8% of students responded “somewhat” or “very” on the 2014 CCSSE survey questions pertaining to their satisfaction with the student support services offered.

% of students responding “somewhat” or “very” on CCSSE questions on student satisfaction of support services offered:


Spring 2016: 53.2%

Spring 2017: 64.8%


(Next administration March/April 2018)



Provision for Developmental Education


 

To assess the fulfillment of the mission component for developmental education, CC uses a combination of data reported by the THECB Accountability system, reports generated internally by the OIR on developmental course and subsequent college-level course completion rates including longitudinal cohort tracking reports, ad hoc OIR reports as requested, and developmental program assessments. A large percentage of CC students enter CC with skill levels in Reading, Writing, or Math that are below state standards for being “college-ready.” State law and the THECB establish the skill levels required for each area that determine if a student is prepared for college-level coursework. Those students not meeting Texas Success Initiative (TSI) standards are placed into remedial coursework to improve their skills. Once the remedial course work is successfully completed the student is allowed to begin taking college-level courses requiring TSI-complete status for that area.


The percent of developmental students successfully completing (a grade of A, B or C) developmental coursework and being allowed to continue on to credit courses requiring college- level Reading, Writing and Math skills is the primary measure of the effectiveness of CC at fulfilling the provision for developmental education. Effectiveness is further evaluated by tracking a student’s success in their first college-level course that is dependent on the area of deficiency as a secondary measure. A threshold level 75% successful completion of developmental coursework and a threshold of 85% successful completion of the first college-level course after completing developmental education have been established for each of the developmental areas. These threshold levels assure an acceptable level of student progression through developmental coursework and the successful completion of the first college level course while also being appropriate to assure an acceptable level for completion of the student’s educational goals. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for Developmental Education.


Table 5: Evaluation Results for Developmental Education

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Developmental Education

Students becoming TSI complete in Reading: 55% of DE Reading students becoming TSI complete and being eligible to take college-level courses requiring TSI completion in Reading.

Reading - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort average: 50.9%


State cohort average: 60.1%

% of DE Students Meeting TSI Obligations in Reading

(2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 65.7%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 57.8%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 60.8%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 54.0% Fall 2015 Cohort: 65.9%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3


Students becoming TSI complete in Writing: 55% of DE Writing students becoming TSI complete and being eligible to take college-level courses requiring TSI completion in Writing.

Writing - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort

average: 49.2%


State cohort average: 56.6%

% of DE Students Meeting TSI Obligations in Writing

(2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 68.1%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 25.0%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 60.6%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 44.0% Fall 2015 Cohort: 63.4%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3


Students becoming TSI complete in Math: 45% of DE Math students becoming TSI complete and being eligible to take college-level courses requiring TSI completion in Math.

Math - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort

average: 40.9%


State cohort average: 44.1%

% of DE Students Meeting TSI Obligations in Math

(2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 34.7%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 40.5%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 45.8%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 42.9% Fall 2015 Cohort: 50.9%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3


DE Reading students successfully completing their first college-level course requiring TSI completion in Reading: 40% of students becoming TSI complete in Reading will successfully complete their first associated college-level course with a “C” or better.

Reading - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort average: 36.6%


State cohort average: 37.8%

% of DE Students Successfully Completing a College-level Reading Course (2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 51.1%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 50.5%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 58.2%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 49.4% Fall 2015 Cohort: 60.6%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3


DE Writing students successfully completing their first college-level course requiring TSI completion in Writing: 40% of students becoming TSI complete in Writing will successfully complete their first associated college-level course with a “C” or better.

Writing - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort

average: 30.4%


State cohort average: 30.3%

% of DE Students Successfully Completing a College-level Writing Course (2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 30.4%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 22.9%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 56.4%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 37.4% Fall 2015 Cohort: 60.7%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3


DE Math students successfully completing their first college-level course requiring TSI completion in Math: 35% of students completing developmental Math courses will successfully complete their first associated college-level course with a “C” or better.

Math - Fall 2006 to Fall 2010 cohort

average: 14.3%


State cohort average: 16.9%

% of DE Students Successfully Completing a College-level Math Course (2-year tracking)

Fall 2011 Cohort: 17.0%

Fall 2012 Cohort: 26.4%

Fall 2013 Cohort: 37.3%

Fall 2014 Cohort: 37.1% Fall 2015 Cohort: 46.1%1 (tracked 1 year)

Fall 2016 Cohort: N/A2 Fall 2017 Cohort: N/A3

1 Developmental Education data for the Fall 2015 cohort is based on 1 year of tracked student data. Two-year data will be made available by THECB in March 2018.

2 Developmental Education data for the Fall 2016 cohort will be made available by THECB in March 2018.

3 Developmental Education data for the Fall 2017 cohort will be made available by THECB in March 2019.

 


Provision for Continuing Education / Community Service Courses



CC provides continuing education and community service courses to members of the communities it serves. Continuing education (CE) courses are scheduled to meet the needs of these communities based on requests from area businesses and community members. In addition, CC strives to identify local training needs for current business and industry, as well as upcoming skills requirements for workforce needs in emerging fields in an effort to be proactive in its CE offering. To evaluate its provision of CE courses and the effectiveness of meeting the needs of the community, CC continually examines the CE courses offered and the enrollments for each. A threshold level of 85% of requests for CE courses that are projected to meet minimum enrollment levels will be offered. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for Continuing Education / Community Service Courses.


Table 6: Evaluation Results for Continuing Education / Community Service Courses

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Continuing Education & Community Service Courses

Number of CE courses offered annually to assure a minimum % of business and community requests for CE courses being met: 85% of business and community requests for CE courses being met by offering 70 CE courses each year.

5-Year Average: 70

Continuing Education Courses offered each year

FY 2010: 66

FY 2011: 65

FY 2012: 57

FY 2013: 80

FY 2014: 83

FY 2015: 75

FY 2016: 88

FY 2017: 101


Annual Enrollment in Continuing Education Courses (unduplicated): Annual unduplicated enrollment in Continuing Education Courses of 450 students.

5-Year Average: 501

Annual Continuing Education Enrollment (unduplicated)

FY 2010: 479

FY 2011: 431

FY 2012: 515

FY 2013: 388

FY 2014: 691

FY 2015: 251

FY 2016: 375

FY 2017: 283


Annual Continuing Education Contact Hours: Annual Contact Hours for Continuing Education Courses of 17,500.

5-Year Average: 18,917

Annual Continuing Education Contact Hours

FY 2010: 22,750

FY 2011: 16,865

FY 2012: 14,309

FY 2013: 18,286

FY 2014: 22,376

FY 2015: 15,577

FY 2016: 23,766

FY 2017: 14,321



Provision for Cultural Enrichment


 


As part of its mission, CC offers or hosts several cultural events each year. These events include staging theater arts productions, hosting art shows, providing lectures and presentations from invited guest speakers, and offering courses that provide cultural enrichment including courses for CC students as well as members of the communities CC serves. A threshold level of 10 offered or hosted events annually was established to support the provision of offering cultural enrichment to the students and communities served by CC, and a threshold of 6 cultural enrichment courses offered each year was established. These threshold levels were based on student and community interest and response to previous cultural enrichment offerings at CC. The following table provides the evaluation criteria and the 2016-2017 evaluation results for the provision for Cultural Enrichment.

Table 7: Evaluation Results for Cultural Enrichment

One College... One Vision Item

Criteria of Effectiveness

Baseline

Results

Provision for Cultural Enrichment

CCSSE questions pertaining to having conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity (question 4s): 80% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” that they had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity.

81.4% of students responded “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on the 2014 CCSSE

survey question pertaining to having serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity.

% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on CCSSE questions on having serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity:


Spring 2016: 76.9%

Spring 2017: 71.2%


(Next administration March/April 2018)


CCSSE questions pertaining to having conversations with students that have different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values. (question 4t): 80% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” that they had serious conversations with students with different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values.

81.0% of students responded “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on the 2014 CCSSE

survey question pertaining to having serious conversations with students with differing religious beliefs, political opinions or personal values.

% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on CCSSE questions on having serious conversations with students that have different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values:


Spring 2016: 76.6%

Spring 2017: 71.2%


(Next administration March/April 2018) 5


CCSSE questions pertaining to encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds (question 9c): 80% of students responding “some”, “quite a bit” or “very much” that CC encourages contact among students from different backgrounds.

88.2% of students responded “some”, “quite a bit” or “very much” on the 2014 CCSSE survey question pertaining to CC encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds.

% of students responding “some”, “quite a bit” or “very much” on CCSSE questions pertaining to CC encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds:


Spring 2016: 81.5%

Spring 2017: 82.2%


(Next administration March/April 2018)


CCSSE questions pertaining to experiences at CC contributing to understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds (question 12k): 80% of students participating in the CCSSE survey responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” that their experiences at CC contribute to their understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds.

85.8% of students responded “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on the 2014 CCSSE

survey question pertaining to their experiences at CC contributing to their understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds.

% of students responding “sometimes”, “often” or “very often” on CCSSE questions pertaining to their experiences at CC contributing to their understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds:


Spring 2016: 83.2%

Spring 2017: 82.2%


(Next administration March/April 2018)


Number of offered or hosted cultural enrichment events: Ten Cultural Enrichment events offered or hosted each year.

5-Year Average: 11

Cultural Enrichment events

FY 2010: 9

FY 2011: 11

FY 2012: 10

FY 2013: 13*

FY 2014: 11*

FY 2015: 11*

FY 2016: 12*

FY 2017: 11


Number of cultural enrichment courses offered: Six Cultural Enrichment courses offered each year.

5-Year Average: 14

Cultural Enrichment courses offered

FY 2010: 15

FY 2011: 9

FY 2012: 9

FY 2013: 13

FY 2014: 27

FY 2015: 24

FY 2016: 19

FY 2017: 21

*Events include a Spanish Heritage event and/or a Black History event, two drama performances, 7-9 library events and various community concerts and presentations.